Category Archives: Social Media

Creating Facebook Cover Images

Covers

With Facebook’s Timeline, business pages have a unique opportunity to grab and engage their audiences. I thought I’d put together some thoughts, tips and guidelines on creating Facebook covers.

**Be aware that if you intend to create your own images you’ll need access to a basic photo editing programme.
 

Basics of Facebook Cover Photos

Firstly, having the correct dimensions will ensure that your picture displays well within the Facebook frame. So here it is:

Facebook Cover Sizes and Elements.

Facebook Cover Sizes and Elements.

Detailed measurements:

  • Official Facebook cover photo size: 851 pixels wide by 315 pixels tall with minimum image dimension of 399 pixels wide
  • To get the fastest load times for your Page, upload an sRGB JPG file that’s 851 pixels wide, 315 pixels tall and less than 100 kilobytes. For images with your logo or text-based content, you may get a higher quality result by using a PNG file. (according to Facebook Help Files)

Important to know:

  • If you upload an image that is smaller than the recommended size, Facebook will stretch it to fit automatically. Be cautious, because stretching the image will also deteriorate the image quality and you don’t want your audience to associate second-rate quality with your business brand.
  • The Facebook frame cuts of the top pixel of your image, so in reality only the bottom 314 pixels will display. Niggly but important since you might want to check that you don’t lose the most important 1 pixel!

What to add and what to avoid

Facebook guidelines stipulate that the cover photo mustn’t be overly promotional in execution. In other words, it shouldn’t contain the following:

All covers are public. This means that anyone who visits your Page will be able to see your cover. Covers can’t be deceptive, misleading, or infringe on anyone else’s copyright. You may not encourage people to upload your cover to their personal timelines.
Covers may not include:
i.    images with more than 20% text;
ii.    price or purchase information, such as “40% off” or “Download it on socialmusic.com”;
iii.    contact information such as a website address, email, mailing address, or information that should go in your Page’s “About” section;
iv.    references to Facebook features or actions, such as “Like” or “Share” or an arrow pointing from the cover photo to any of these features; or
v.    calls to action, such as “Get it now” or “Tell your friends.”

So what can we do with our cover photo?

  • Use imagery or design work that is yours to begin with. Grab your camera or iPhone and take pictures or ask a professional photographer to help capture your people, your brand and your products. You can have lots of creative fun with this!
  • Remember to give credit if you use photos or visuals that aren’t yours!
  • Use your business tagline and add it as text to your cover photo.
  • Tag people who are in the photo. Be sure to ask their permission if they are associates or clients. If they are staff members, notify them! It is a frowned-upon tactic to tag random people in your cover to shamelessly promote your business.
  • Get your employs and clients to submit their pictures to use for the cover.

Make sure that you use high-quality photos and visuals that are in-focus.

Getting the photo onto Facebook

A couple of clicks an you’ll be done.

  1. Log into your Facebook Page admin account.
  2. To replace an existing cover photo, mouse over your cover photo so that the “Change Cover” button appears in the lower right corner; click it.
  3. Select “Upload Photo,” find the image file on your computer, then click the “Save Changes” button.
  4. Then click on the photo to add a caption, tags, and location information.

Next time we’ll look into how to create GREAT Facebook Cover images!

Diva, over-and-out.

If all the pixels got you warped and confused, perhaps it’s time to call in some help :)
junkies@adrinalinconcept.co.za
ADRINALIN CONCEPT | Comprehensive Creative Design, Marketing, Communication, Social Media, Copy Writing & Change Management

 

** Useful site: http://www.copyblogger.com/timeline-cover-photo/


Admin roles on Facebook

New admin roles on Facebook

Facebook has finally empowered us with the ability to assign different levels of access / ability to the administrators on Facebook Pages. This is great because:

  1. Divide and conquer. The ability to differentiate between a Content Creator, Moderator or Advertiser finally allows us to create job-specific profiles for our social media content managers. A big fear I often encounter from business managers is that employees will spend too much time on social media. In South Africa only the larger corporates are branching out and making room from dedicated social media communicators/ brand managers. For the most part, the job still falls to a “lucky”  employee who has but one more duty to add to their “to-do-list”. The new roles
    might force us to start thinking in terms of achieving objectives with our social media communications. I for one am looking forward to more insightful, authentic communication from South African brands / business.
  2. Less risk. We are a conservative, risk-averse people. Placing your ‘online’ brand in the hands of but one individual might just have been too much to handle for most. Now we can make intelligent choices about accountability without handing over the steering wheel.

What roles look like on Facebook

Admin roles on Facebook.

Image from Social Media Examiner.

And now…

The ball is in your court again. Make time to sit down with your social media communicators and plot both your strategy and roles. Divide time & effort and create specific expectations – this is always the best way to ensure that you achieve an actual goal.

If you a) don’t have a social media team yet OR b) don’t know what to say to or expect of them – let me help you.

You KNOW this Diva is just dying to put you on the Social Media Map :)

Toodles.


Afrikaners is plesierig

So the song starts at least. Two of the things I encounter most often when dealing with social media are:

  1. We don’t want to open our brand to attack or negative comments. (Client / business perspective). Which is completely understandable, since the most common user perspective seems to be…
  2. I don’t want to waste time on Facebook or Twitter until I had a negative brand experience.  (Individual user perspective). At this point we often find socially inactive or dormant users awaken to blurt out their frustrations on a social platform.

How very odd. Apparently we don’t trust social sites enough to let them dramatically influence our purchasing patterns yet but we (as individuals) believe that we can negatively impact a brand by blurting out our frustrations in the social mix.

Very, very odd. Perhaps we aren’t so very “plesierig” after all.

So what to do now?

As a business:

  1. Stop the fear cycle. If they have something negative to say, they will do it regardless of whether you have a page or not. My thoughts are that if you have a centralised business page you at least have the capacity to influence the conversation and resulting perceptions. (You could of course follow trending topics and monitor how your brand is talked about but my guess is that if you are still debating the virtues of Facebook, this is might as well be written in Greek….)
  2. Swift, sharp, to the point. If you receive negative comments react as quickly as possible (within 2 hours). Don’t take it so personally – focus on getting to the root of the problem and advise on your findings and your intended corrective action. If the conversation is deliberately malicious, delete the post and take it offline. (You are after all the page admin!)
  3. Keep your house in order. Don’t make claims that are untrue, publish rude or offensive comments or advertise misleading promotions. If you don’t create obvious gaps in your integrity, you’ll be pleasantly surprised by the lack of attack from Joe public.

As a person:

  1. Don’t be so quick to assume that your comment will sink a ship. Don’t underestimate the value of your opinion either. If you have a legitimate concern feel free to express yourself but take heed! Avoid enraged comments with flowery, emotive or offensive language. If you have it, say it and stick with it.
  2. If you really want to have influence, build your network. Having 50 Facebook friends doesn’t make you a social sheik. Sure 50 of your friends might consider never buying xxx milk again but so what? Grow your network (i.e. make more friends) if you want to have a real circle of influence.
  3. Try out the rest. Use the variety of social platforms as more than just a soap box. Look for friends. Pin a picture on Pinterest. Post a video on YouTube, or if that is too frightening at least comment on someone else’s, Tweet a comment on a worthwhile subject or share a (meaningful) thought on an interesting blog (The Spear lives On).

 

And while we are at it

let’s work on being more “plesierig”. Put equal amounts of zeal and effort in congratulating and complaining. Use your posts / tweets / comments or blurbs to commend businesses / brands on extraordinary customer service experiences. Changing a culture starts with you and me – its time to revolutionise the South African social media experience.

Diva, over and out!

Social Media Mixing (courtesy of http://www.bnettv.com/social-media-marketing/)


Lekker local social-mix

So we have established that America has left me with an epiphany. We are not American! Great you say, she flies thousands of kilometers to figure out something we already knew. Well, I believe there is more to it.

Why the difference matters

Being different might be an established fact in your mind but wherever I look I see the same international laws and premises being applied to our local culture. There are a growing number of individuals who offer their services and expertise on the Social Media Communications front but they are all doing the same thing. Reading the same Mashable posts and tips, using Google and finding resources like Social Media Examiner and imposing their truths on the South African market. If we agree that the South African market is different then we need to accept the implications of that statement. We cannot impose their rules on our market. We simply aren’t ready for it yet. To refresh yourself on why I believe our market is so different, read this post.

So what do we do?

Take a deep breath. We will be fine. We will also probably catch up with the American (and other international) markets but until we do we need to make our rules stick.

The American market (and home to the famous reference sites like SME, Mashable and others) uses social media as an accepted communication platform, they use multiple platforms without going into shock and private users accept that businesses and brands will communicate with them socially.

The South African market is still debating whether or not to jump into the social pool. Individuals are still obsessed with the threat of identity theft. Once we decide to venture into the pool, we fret about which platform, how often, why, and what to say. We are still living in fear of the social media revolution. I do believe that this will change but it doesn’t change the fact that our approach should be different.

How to communicate with the SOUTH AFRICAN market SOCIALLY:

  1. Stop obsessing about frequency and timings of your posts / tweets or pins. Focus on being authentic. Don’t waste time with irrelevant updates that are both annoying and time-wasters. American trends have taught us that interaction is most effective when FB post happen at least daily and tweets are sent at least 8 times per day – true for a country that has enough happening to fill the space.
  2. Look at the game plan. Social media is here to stay. It will grow and evolve with time and so will you. Just because you communicate via Facebook today doesn’t mean you can’t change your mind in the future. It is a free world and we live in a country that encourages democratic opinions. Decide what will work for you now, use it, try it and adapt.
  3. Remember the local-is-lekker consumer. South African consumers are by nature more distrustful. We are hesitant to engage with internet sites, we doubt most of what we read (unless it is a SPAM-chain-mail that offers millions if you only send it on and CC IOL!) and we have only a small percentage of our market represented on the internet. In the bigger scheme of things, don’t drop all your communication efforts in favour of a social media strategy that will exhaust you. Perspective….

Was it all for nothing?

Of course not. Like I said. Social media is here to stay. Get used to it. Incorporate it into your marketing mix but remember that we are a proud country with a unique, diverse population. Don’t obsess about Facebook, Twitter & YouTube. Relax. Remember that social media, more than any other communication platform available to you, is about creating a conversation with your market. So start talking.

That isn’t so frightening, is it?

Diva, out.


Socially in South Africa

10 days in the USA! It was amazing. The trip of a lifetime. A conference in Atlanta and my ENTIRE first day was filled with speakers talking about various social media angles. Having listened to them, working through my notes and just taking stock, here’s what I now know (perhaps I even knew it all along)….

My social media take-aways from the USA:

 

  1. South Africa is not the USA. Our consumers and social groups have not adopted social media communication to the level the international audience has. I do believe that we will get there, but at the moment our social media landscapes differ significantly. Here, I still start most social media conversations with the “why you should” sentence or the “benefits of”. There it is an assumed reality that you are connected socially on more than one platform. Delegates swapped social addresses like we would exchange business cards. Conference updates happened via Twitter and both delegates and organizers used the platform well without the fall back to more traditional communication methods. In other words – there was no FEAR…
  2. We aren’t ready to be the USA just yet. I felt completely exposed and laid bare with life happening in split-second bursts in the online world and it left me wondering whether it really is so bad to be patient while our country and culture readies itself for real global, social connectivity? I will be more focused on equipping our clients with appropriate communication skills than to rush them onto social media soapboxes (with nothing to say).
  3. We don’t have to pretend it’s our invention. Kudos belong (and should remain) with the North American’s, we don’t have to try and do it all over again. I was overwhelmed with the quality, quantity and type of social media interaction I experienced during my brief visit to the States. We should look at what works for them and then add our own Local is Lekker flavour. It’s OK to do what works… :)

 

And lastly, I was pleased to see that although all of the above is true, our (Adrinalin Concept) interpretation of sound social media practices stood with the rest. You can look forward to more from us on:

  1. Engaging with your audience in a meaningful way.
  2. Connecting with parents.
  3. To do and not do’s

If you have any questions or comments please feel free to leave them here or on our Facebook wall!


Facebook Timeline for Brands Coming Later This Month [REPORT].

Facebook Timeline for Brands

Facebook Timeline for Brands Coming Later This Month [REPORT].

This article by Mashable tells how Facebook will “its Feb. 29 conference for marketers in New York to announce the initiative to deploy Timeline for Business Pages to a handful of pages. I have been waiting for this!

What to expect from Facebook Timeline?

What an exciting development in the Social Media world:

  • Large visuals
  • A way for companies to retell their corporate tale
  • Highlights and achievements
  • More fun, more visual, more dynamic – more amazing!

What I am not sure of is:

  • What will happen to the Tabs currently in corporated in so many pages?
  • The expected timeline (excuse the pun :D) for this launch to reach all business pages?

But, I STILL LOVE it! The Mashable article includes some examples of what other designers have thought brand pages might look like. Here’s what I think ours could look like…

Adrinalin Concept - A Timeline Concept

Today, this Diva is smiling from ear to ear :D !

 


Trashing your Boss on Facebook (An Article on Caution via www.labourwise.co.za!)

TRASHING YOUR BOSS ON FACEBOOK

From an article on www.labourwise.co.za

Social networks, such as Facebook, serve as a useful vehicle for sharing one’s personal views. It can also have unexpected and unfortunate ramifications. One example is when an employee makes use of a social network to air his views about his or her employer. It would seem that, for some reason or other, employees lose their inhibitions when there is a screen between them and the world out there.

There have been several cases where employees have used a social network, such as Facebook and Twitter, to say nasty things about their employers.

It is one thing to speak your heart out about your boss to a friend over a drink. As soon as you post it on a social network, though, two important dimensions are added: Firstly, your thoughts or words are recorded in text and cannot be retracted; secondly, you lose control over its distribution.

Who can blame an employer for wanting to take disciplinary action if an employee’s caustic comments about the employer are given publicity in this way? Several questions arise, though:

  1. What if it did not happen at work or during working hours?
  2. What about the employee’s right to privacy? Can the employer rely on evidence that was meant to be private?
  3. Does the employee’s position within the company make a difference?
  4. Does the remark necessarily destroy the employment relationship?

These considerations were addressed very lucidly in the CCMA-case of Sedick & another vs Krisray (Pty) Ltd.

Two senior employees were dismissed for having exchanges via Facebook regarding the employer and members of management. They exchanged several snide remarks about the founder of the business and younger family members that were brought in to help manage the business. These remarks included “Trust me no one can put up with so much shit when the fing kids join the company!”; “From so-called ‘professionalism 2 dumb brats runnin a mickey mouse business”; “… today was hectic with Frankentein”; “What an idiot”; “a very ugly man with a dark soul”.

In this case the dismissal was not challenged on the basis that the exchanges had happened outside of working hours. However, it has become a firmly established principle that an employer may take action against employees for conduct outside working hours if such conduct has an adverse impact on the employment relationship.

As far as the issue of privacy is concerned, the commissioner noted that the internet is, for most part, public domain. This also applies to Facebook, to the extent that the employees had not restricted access to the relevant pages. As a consequence of their failure to make use of the privacy options, they had abandoned their right to privacy and the protections of the Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication-related Information Act of 2002 (“The Interception Act”).

Although no names were mentioned, the employees were intentionally communicating with subordinates within the company, as well as with ex-employees and other persons. According to the commissioner this meant that two of the senior employees in the organisation were publicly making derogatory and demeaning remarks about the director and management to persons who, on the balance of probability, were fully aware about whom these comments were being made. Whilst some of the postings were quite innocuous and not, in the commissioner’s opinion, all that damaging to the employment relationship, the greater number were extremely serious and, if not constituting insubordination, certainly constituted gross insolence. After taking into account what had been written, where the comments had been posted, to whom they had been directed and by whom they had been said, the commissioner found that dismissal was a fair sanction.

The arbitration award was concluded with the following terse observation: “If employees wish their opinions to remain private, they should refrain from posting them on the internet”.

Jan Truter of www.labourwise.co.za

This entry was written by Labourwise www.labourwise.co.za is an on-line labour relations service aimed at assisting employers with the implementation of effective labour relations. They can be contacted via the website or info@labourwise.co.za.

Adrinalin Point-of-View:

Social media sites are public – VERY public – and whether you are acting as an individual, a business representative, an employee or a business owner BE AWARE. Don’t post pictures or post willy-nilly. Decide what your core values are (in any and all of the above instances) and post according to this self-imposed standard.

Encourage yourself, your employees and your colleagues to maintain integrity-based, authentic and professional images for themselves and your business. Don’t abandon the fun, just be cautious when it comes to posting online.

Diva over-and-out.