Tag Archives: Business Pages

Key Take-Aways about Facebook

Fear of Facebook

Engaging on Social Media platform (like Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn) is still a pretty daunting concept for South African SME’s if our day-to-day clients are anything to go by. The typical issues they grapple with are:

  1. Should I bother? (I believe we have conclusively answered this question.)
  2. If I do bother, what should I write about? (Again, we have posted on this previously.)
  3. Does it matter? Ahhh, now we we get to the fun stuff. Do we know that what you are doing is making a difference? Firstly, your Facebook page insights will be crucial in understanding the efficacy of your posting methodology. Secondly, your page interactions will also provide you with real-time feedback. I have said it before and I will say it again – every strategy MUST be different. This means that you can model your strategy on what others have successfully implemented but you must try your own hand at it.
  4. Who am I writing for? Putting a face to this concept has proven to help our clients significantly when it comes to maintaining an active social media strategy. And that is what I want to do today – share some insights about Facebook users with you.

Social Media Statistics & Facts

(Circulated from Social Media Examiner) Please note that this data focuses on the American Online community. takeaway’s are extrapolated from there.

What was found in this recent study on the habits of Social Media users, included some of the following interesting facts and take-aways:

  1. Online users still prefer to use Facebook over other networks like Blogger, Tumblr, Twitter and LinkedIn (listed in order of usage preference). Online users spent a total of 53, 457, 258 000 min’s on Facebook during the month of May 2011. Closest competitor was Blogger where users spent a total 723, 793 000 min’s online during the month. Take away – It IS worth the effort and time.
  2. More than half of Facebook users log in every day – that’s more than 400 million people.
  3. The average user has 130 friends and is connected to 80 pages, events and groups.
  4. There are 900 million objects that people interact with (pages, groups, etc…).
  5. Facebook hosts over 7 million apps, and over 20 million apps are downloaded each day.
  6. Around 75% of Facebook users are outside of North America with accounts available in 70 languages.
  7. The average user spends about 20min logged into his / her account

And here’s a humdinger:

  1. 51% Facebook fans are more likely to purchase the brands they follow!

Crucial take-away’s

  1. Be sure to integrate your social media efforts with your website and mail efforts (online and offline).
  2. Because many customers show a tendency to stay on social media sites, find ways to keep them engaged.
  3. The previous five statistics show the strong competition for eyeballs. A critical success factor for getting seen is consistency. There is a cumulative effect to your social efforts. The next stat highlights this.
  4. Don’t use the excuses of having a limited budget or a small fan base to prevent you from broadening and deepening your social efforts.
Start your business dialogue on Facebook

Start your business dialogue on Facebook

Conclusion

Stop the fear. Dip your toe into the social media pool – you are bound to find that your consumer engagements deepen, intensify and become more rewarding. If you are swimming in the online pool already, work towards maintaining consistency and visibility.

If you need help with your Social Media (Facebook) strategy – book your seat at our Facebook for 2012 (Straterific Workshop) on Friday 25 November 2011. For more information or to book e-mail junkies@adrinalinconcept.co.za

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Custom pages on Facebook

Despite the imminent arrival of Facebook’s Timeline, there has been no clear communicate to indicate how Facebook Business Pages will be influenced by the changes. In the meantime, let’s ignore Timeline and work with what we’ve got.

Facebook business pages give businesses (individuals, SMME’s and even multi-faceted corporates) a platform from where they communicate directly with a captive, active audience. These platforms are typically not positioned as selling tools, but rather as brand-voice tools. Think of it as an opportunity for you business / brand to have an energetic conversation with an individual that actually wants to hear more about you, interesting tales that create a picture of the who, what, where and why & let’s not forget – they want competitions, polls and current, reliable information. So let’s give it to them!

But how should we package this? You basically have 2 options.

Option 1:

Creating a Business Page and populate the page with all your information.

Local business page.

No funny business. There is no custom development and nothing out of the ordinary. In terms of functionality, it is similar to many other pages on Facebook. But it could offer so much more!

Option 2:

Use custom development AND unique creative concepts that portray your brand favourably.

International example

Skittles business page with custom developmentLocal Business page with custom development, content and interactivity.


Creating a business page that is infused with your business personality and ethos means that your captive audience will have a better sense of who you are and what you stand for.

Facebook users are looking for fun and interactivity. They don’t want to be “sold to” directly but they don’t mind engaging with their brands of choice.

Custom development combined with targeted, creative campaigns create:

  • more “likes”
  • more page interactions
  • better search engine indexing
  • a more definitive & visually appealing social brand presence

Creating your custom landing page

Some points to consider when creating your custom landing page:

  • Avoid unprofessional imagery and visuals. There is a reason why the good designers are qualified designers
  • Keywords / copy that form part of your overall online strategy. Consistency consistency consistency
  • One concept at a time
  • Text that is readable rather than flat images
  • Buttons / links (use this functionality to introduce external information from your website for instance)
  • Media combinations (photos, video)

And of course a clear call to action!

Conclusion:

There is no logical reason for your brand to be stagnate, stale or mediocre. By combining clever design, great copy and focussed campaigning you can make your effort spent on social media lucrative and worthwhile.

If you have suggestions for great or not-so-great pages, feel free to share.


Complaints on Facebook

A recent query from a colleague alerted me to just how overly sensitive we still are to seeing complaint appear in our social media streams. Granted, it does sort of get your gut twisted and your blood draining when you open your stream and there it is for the whole world to see. My colleague’s reaction was to want to hit the “Remove this Post” button but is that the right way to go about it?

John Beale shared his experiences when dealing with online complaints in the post entitled Ten types of social media complaints on BizCommunity. He lists ten types of complaints and how to deal with them.  Valuable insight and a concise summary of complaint-type consumer engagements we can expect in our various streams.

What I would like to highlight as a conclusion from this particular post is the following: In not ONE of the types of complaints does he (or I, as a matter of fact!) ever suggest that you put your head in the sand in pretend it did not happen!

Typically every type of post (and platform) has a unique approach to take, but in general terms what I suggested to my colleague (and clients in the past) is this:

  1. Acknowledge the post or comment
  2. Indicate how you will be addressing the concern (i.e. “We will investigate and report back within 24hrs etc.)
  3. Indicate specific time-frames where possible and stick to them
  4. DO NOT engage in an emotive response where you simply defend your position (SMME’s are typically prone to this type of reaction)
  5. Use this opportunity to assist the consumer to resolve their complaint OR to change your processes to prevent this from happening again (learning opportunity in other words)

I know, it’s like showing up at school and realising you didn’t prepare for the test. Fact remains, you’ve gotta do it. Avoiding confrontation leaves a bad taste in the consumer’s mouth and creates the impression that your brand / business and ultimately you (SMME’s!) don’t care. It just isn’t worth it.

Diva, done.


Writing for Facebook

Facebook is growing, evolving and constantly changing the rules. Online communicators can’t afford to become complacent or lethargic. There is more and more content being circulated via Facebook and other social networking platforms. The overall effect that we are finding (looking specifically again at examples from our South African client base) that this is creating a more discerning reader. With so much on offer, we need to constantly work at adapting and innovating when we write for Facebook.

Here are three tips I always offer to my clients:

  1. Not all readers are alike. Some think visually others like intellectual stimulation and some still look to social networking sites for diversion and escapism. When we create your content strategy, try to incorporate messaging that will appeal to a broad reader-demographic. This means that you will need to create fun, interactive posts, try to incorporate meaningful polls and of course add videos and photos when appropriate.
  2. Circulating content from other blogs and websites. Subscribe to sites and pages that you like and that could add value to your content strategy and share the stand-out posts. What is even more meaningful is to add your own opinion, thoughts, comments or polls based on this content. In other words, use it but make it your own! Please give credit where due and don’t plagiarize.
  3. Don’t sell. Teach, inform, educate, introduce your brand personality and even have fun. You should ideally be prompting readers to visit your website regularly – they can learn more about your products and services there. Don’t spoil your online networking by mistaking it for a door-to-door sales opportunity.

And of course, don’t be stale. Try new ideas. Ask different people in your company to contribute posts and encourage interactivity and dialogue whenever possible.

Our favourite page of this week (with some excellent examples of the above) is Intiem / Intimacy Magazine. Have a look at their live chat sessions and the amount of activity on the page – we give them our A-D-A (Adrinalin Diva Approval) stamp. If you have more examples, please feel free to share.

Diva, over and out.


Facebook for the South African SMME

Facebook is a hot hot hot potato. Looking at the potential impact your Facebook Business Page can have on the South African (SMME) market, I have established the following:

SMME business’s are keen to dip their toes into the Facebook pool but they appear to be unsure of how to manage the soapbox once the get on it.

The reality is that as a SMME, you probably don’t have the resources allow one person (whether an employee or yourself) to commit 100% of their time to manage your online communication strategy. That is of course assuming that you actually HAVE a communication strategy in place….

My 5 top tips to optimise your time (and effort) spent on Facebook are:

  • DON’T use a personal page as a business page. Even if you are a Sole Proprietor or a Consultant, make use of the Business Page facility. It appears unprofessional when a “business” suddenly declares that it has a degree in Business Administration from this-or-that University. Business Page also allow you to promote events and add custom fields and pages which creates a more meaningful impression with your fans.
  • Make an effort to create a unique page for your business. Consider developing a landing page that encourages visitors to “Like” your page or that simply presents your HOOK in a fun, creative fashion.
  • Remember at all times, that Facebook doesn’t work effectively when used as a selling platform. Your visitors are desperate for good, worthwhile content that adds value to their business or personal lives. If your content doesn’t fit the bill, they will simply not return.
  • Have a plan. Work towards a goal. A structured under-current in your messaging helps your fans / readers to easily identify with the online personality you are creating. Haphazard comments that don’t ever draw a sensible conclusion, leave your visitors confused an unsatisfied.
  • Daily activity. Think of it as talking with your best friend – sharing an essential piece of news every day. You can’t only resort to using Social Media platforms when you suddenly need more sales. You have to maintain the “friendship”. Trust takes time – invest in your online relationships. It is important to note that different Social Media Networking platforms require different levels of input and frequency.

If you plan your online activity and focus on using one or two suitable platforms efficiently and effectively, you will soon develop a routine. I have found with most of my clients that 15 to 30 minutes a day is mostly all that is needed to maintain a productive online communication strategy.

Happy writing!