Tag Archives: South African Facebook

Admin roles on Facebook

New admin roles on Facebook

Facebook has finally empowered us with the ability to assign different levels of access / ability to the administrators on Facebook Pages. This is great because:

  1. Divide and conquer. The ability to differentiate between a Content Creator, Moderator or Advertiser finally allows us to create job-specific profiles for our social media content managers. A big fear I often encounter from business managers is that employees will spend too much time on social media. In South Africa only the larger corporates are branching out and making room from dedicated social media communicators/ brand managers. For the most part, the job still falls to a “lucky”  employee who has but one more duty to add to their “to-do-list”. The new roles
    might force us to start thinking in terms of achieving objectives with our social media communications. I for one am looking forward to more insightful, authentic communication from South African brands / business.
  2. Less risk. We are a conservative, risk-averse people. Placing your ‘online’ brand in the hands of but one individual might just have been too much to handle for most. Now we can make intelligent choices about accountability without handing over the steering wheel.

What roles look like on Facebook

Admin roles on Facebook.

Image from Social Media Examiner.

And now…

The ball is in your court again. Make time to sit down with your social media communicators and plot both your strategy and roles. Divide time & effort and create specific expectations – this is always the best way to ensure that you achieve an actual goal.

If you a) don’t have a social media team yet OR b) don’t know what to say to or expect of them – let me help you.

You KNOW this Diva is just dying to put you on the Social Media Map :)

Toodles.

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Lekker local social-mix

So we have established that America has left me with an epiphany. We are not American! Great you say, she flies thousands of kilometers to figure out something we already knew. Well, I believe there is more to it.

Why the difference matters

Being different might be an established fact in your mind but wherever I look I see the same international laws and premises being applied to our local culture. There are a growing number of individuals who offer their services and expertise on the Social Media Communications front but they are all doing the same thing. Reading the same Mashable posts and tips, using Google and finding resources like Social Media Examiner and imposing their truths on the South African market. If we agree that the South African market is different then we need to accept the implications of that statement. We cannot impose their rules on our market. We simply aren’t ready for it yet. To refresh yourself on why I believe our market is so different, read this post.

So what do we do?

Take a deep breath. We will be fine. We will also probably catch up with the American (and other international) markets but until we do we need to make our rules stick.

The American market (and home to the famous reference sites like SME, Mashable and others) uses social media as an accepted communication platform, they use multiple platforms without going into shock and private users accept that businesses and brands will communicate with them socially.

The South African market is still debating whether or not to jump into the social pool. Individuals are still obsessed with the threat of identity theft. Once we decide to venture into the pool, we fret about which platform, how often, why, and what to say. We are still living in fear of the social media revolution. I do believe that this will change but it doesn’t change the fact that our approach should be different.

How to communicate with the SOUTH AFRICAN market SOCIALLY:

  1. Stop obsessing about frequency and timings of your posts / tweets or pins. Focus on being authentic. Don’t waste time with irrelevant updates that are both annoying and time-wasters. American trends have taught us that interaction is most effective when FB post happen at least daily and tweets are sent at least 8 times per day – true for a country that has enough happening to fill the space.
  2. Look at the game plan. Social media is here to stay. It will grow and evolve with time and so will you. Just because you communicate via Facebook today doesn’t mean you can’t change your mind in the future. It is a free world and we live in a country that encourages democratic opinions. Decide what will work for you now, use it, try it and adapt.
  3. Remember the local-is-lekker consumer. South African consumers are by nature more distrustful. We are hesitant to engage with internet sites, we doubt most of what we read (unless it is a SPAM-chain-mail that offers millions if you only send it on and CC IOL!) and we have only a small percentage of our market represented on the internet. In the bigger scheme of things, don’t drop all your communication efforts in favour of a social media strategy that will exhaust you. Perspective….

Was it all for nothing?

Of course not. Like I said. Social media is here to stay. Get used to it. Incorporate it into your marketing mix but remember that we are a proud country with a unique, diverse population. Don’t obsess about Facebook, Twitter & YouTube. Relax. Remember that social media, more than any other communication platform available to you, is about creating a conversation with your market. So start talking.

That isn’t so frightening, is it?

Diva, out.


Trashing your Boss on Facebook (An Article on Caution via www.labourwise.co.za!)

TRASHING YOUR BOSS ON FACEBOOK

From an article on www.labourwise.co.za

Social networks, such as Facebook, serve as a useful vehicle for sharing one’s personal views. It can also have unexpected and unfortunate ramifications. One example is when an employee makes use of a social network to air his views about his or her employer. It would seem that, for some reason or other, employees lose their inhibitions when there is a screen between them and the world out there.

There have been several cases where employees have used a social network, such as Facebook and Twitter, to say nasty things about their employers.

It is one thing to speak your heart out about your boss to a friend over a drink. As soon as you post it on a social network, though, two important dimensions are added: Firstly, your thoughts or words are recorded in text and cannot be retracted; secondly, you lose control over its distribution.

Who can blame an employer for wanting to take disciplinary action if an employee’s caustic comments about the employer are given publicity in this way? Several questions arise, though:

  1. What if it did not happen at work or during working hours?
  2. What about the employee’s right to privacy? Can the employer rely on evidence that was meant to be private?
  3. Does the employee’s position within the company make a difference?
  4. Does the remark necessarily destroy the employment relationship?

These considerations were addressed very lucidly in the CCMA-case of Sedick & another vs Krisray (Pty) Ltd.

Two senior employees were dismissed for having exchanges via Facebook regarding the employer and members of management. They exchanged several snide remarks about the founder of the business and younger family members that were brought in to help manage the business. These remarks included “Trust me no one can put up with so much shit when the fing kids join the company!”; “From so-called ‘professionalism 2 dumb brats runnin a mickey mouse business”; “… today was hectic with Frankentein”; “What an idiot”; “a very ugly man with a dark soul”.

In this case the dismissal was not challenged on the basis that the exchanges had happened outside of working hours. However, it has become a firmly established principle that an employer may take action against employees for conduct outside working hours if such conduct has an adverse impact on the employment relationship.

As far as the issue of privacy is concerned, the commissioner noted that the internet is, for most part, public domain. This also applies to Facebook, to the extent that the employees had not restricted access to the relevant pages. As a consequence of their failure to make use of the privacy options, they had abandoned their right to privacy and the protections of the Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication-related Information Act of 2002 (“The Interception Act”).

Although no names were mentioned, the employees were intentionally communicating with subordinates within the company, as well as with ex-employees and other persons. According to the commissioner this meant that two of the senior employees in the organisation were publicly making derogatory and demeaning remarks about the director and management to persons who, on the balance of probability, were fully aware about whom these comments were being made. Whilst some of the postings were quite innocuous and not, in the commissioner’s opinion, all that damaging to the employment relationship, the greater number were extremely serious and, if not constituting insubordination, certainly constituted gross insolence. After taking into account what had been written, where the comments had been posted, to whom they had been directed and by whom they had been said, the commissioner found that dismissal was a fair sanction.

The arbitration award was concluded with the following terse observation: “If employees wish their opinions to remain private, they should refrain from posting them on the internet”.

Jan Truter of www.labourwise.co.za

This entry was written by Labourwise www.labourwise.co.za is an on-line labour relations service aimed at assisting employers with the implementation of effective labour relations. They can be contacted via the website or info@labourwise.co.za.

Adrinalin Point-of-View:

Social media sites are public – VERY public – and whether you are acting as an individual, a business representative, an employee or a business owner BE AWARE. Don’t post pictures or post willy-nilly. Decide what your core values are (in any and all of the above instances) and post according to this self-imposed standard.

Encourage yourself, your employees and your colleagues to maintain integrity-based, authentic and professional images for themselves and your business. Don’t abandon the fun, just be cautious when it comes to posting online.

Diva over-and-out.


Key Take-Aways about Facebook

Fear of Facebook

Engaging on Social Media platform (like Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn) is still a pretty daunting concept for South African SME’s if our day-to-day clients are anything to go by. The typical issues they grapple with are:

  1. Should I bother? (I believe we have conclusively answered this question.)
  2. If I do bother, what should I write about? (Again, we have posted on this previously.)
  3. Does it matter? Ahhh, now we we get to the fun stuff. Do we know that what you are doing is making a difference? Firstly, your Facebook page insights will be crucial in understanding the efficacy of your posting methodology. Secondly, your page interactions will also provide you with real-time feedback. I have said it before and I will say it again – every strategy MUST be different. This means that you can model your strategy on what others have successfully implemented but you must try your own hand at it.
  4. Who am I writing for? Putting a face to this concept has proven to help our clients significantly when it comes to maintaining an active social media strategy. And that is what I want to do today – share some insights about Facebook users with you.

Social Media Statistics & Facts

(Circulated from Social Media Examiner) Please note that this data focuses on the American Online community. takeaway’s are extrapolated from there.

What was found in this recent study on the habits of Social Media users, included some of the following interesting facts and take-aways:

  1. Online users still prefer to use Facebook over other networks like Blogger, Tumblr, Twitter and LinkedIn (listed in order of usage preference). Online users spent a total of 53, 457, 258 000 min’s on Facebook during the month of May 2011. Closest competitor was Blogger where users spent a total 723, 793 000 min’s online during the month. Take away – It IS worth the effort and time.
  2. More than half of Facebook users log in every day – that’s more than 400 million people.
  3. The average user has 130 friends and is connected to 80 pages, events and groups.
  4. There are 900 million objects that people interact with (pages, groups, etc…).
  5. Facebook hosts over 7 million apps, and over 20 million apps are downloaded each day.
  6. Around 75% of Facebook users are outside of North America with accounts available in 70 languages.
  7. The average user spends about 20min logged into his / her account

And here’s a humdinger:

  1. 51% Facebook fans are more likely to purchase the brands they follow!

Crucial take-away’s

  1. Be sure to integrate your social media efforts with your website and mail efforts (online and offline).
  2. Because many customers show a tendency to stay on social media sites, find ways to keep them engaged.
  3. The previous five statistics show the strong competition for eyeballs. A critical success factor for getting seen is consistency. There is a cumulative effect to your social efforts. The next stat highlights this.
  4. Don’t use the excuses of having a limited budget or a small fan base to prevent you from broadening and deepening your social efforts.
Start your business dialogue on Facebook

Start your business dialogue on Facebook

Conclusion

Stop the fear. Dip your toe into the social media pool – you are bound to find that your consumer engagements deepen, intensify and become more rewarding. If you are swimming in the online pool already, work towards maintaining consistency and visibility.

If you need help with your Social Media (Facebook) strategy – book your seat at our Facebook for 2012 (Straterific Workshop) on Friday 25 November 2011. For more information or to book e-mail junkies@adrinalinconcept.co.za


Writing for Facebook

Facebook is growing, evolving and constantly changing the rules. Online communicators can’t afford to become complacent or lethargic. There is more and more content being circulated via Facebook and other social networking platforms. The overall effect that we are finding (looking specifically again at examples from our South African client base) that this is creating a more discerning reader. With so much on offer, we need to constantly work at adapting and innovating when we write for Facebook.

Here are three tips I always offer to my clients:

  1. Not all readers are alike. Some think visually others like intellectual stimulation and some still look to social networking sites for diversion and escapism. When we create your content strategy, try to incorporate messaging that will appeal to a broad reader-demographic. This means that you will need to create fun, interactive posts, try to incorporate meaningful polls and of course add videos and photos when appropriate.
  2. Circulating content from other blogs and websites. Subscribe to sites and pages that you like and that could add value to your content strategy and share the stand-out posts. What is even more meaningful is to add your own opinion, thoughts, comments or polls based on this content. In other words, use it but make it your own! Please give credit where due and don’t plagiarize.
  3. Don’t sell. Teach, inform, educate, introduce your brand personality and even have fun. You should ideally be prompting readers to visit your website regularly – they can learn more about your products and services there. Don’t spoil your online networking by mistaking it for a door-to-door sales opportunity.

And of course, don’t be stale. Try new ideas. Ask different people in your company to contribute posts and encourage interactivity and dialogue whenever possible.

Our favourite page of this week (with some excellent examples of the above) is Intiem / Intimacy Magazine. Have a look at their live chat sessions and the amount of activity on the page – we give them our A-D-A (Adrinalin Diva Approval) stamp. If you have more examples, please feel free to share.

Diva, over and out.