Tag Archives: tips

Creating Facebook Cover Images

Covers

With Facebook’s Timeline, business pages have a unique opportunity to grab and engage their audiences. I thought I’d put together some thoughts, tips and guidelines on creating Facebook covers.

**Be aware that if you intend to create your own images you’ll need access to a basic photo editing programme.
 

Basics of Facebook Cover Photos

Firstly, having the correct dimensions will ensure that your picture displays well within the Facebook frame. So here it is:

Facebook Cover Sizes and Elements.

Facebook Cover Sizes and Elements.

Detailed measurements:

  • Official Facebook cover photo size: 851 pixels wide by 315 pixels tall with minimum image dimension of 399 pixels wide
  • To get the fastest load times for your Page, upload an sRGB JPG file that’s 851 pixels wide, 315 pixels tall and less than 100 kilobytes. For images with your logo or text-based content, you may get a higher quality result by using a PNG file. (according to Facebook Help Files)

Important to know:

  • If you upload an image that is smaller than the recommended size, Facebook will stretch it to fit automatically. Be cautious, because stretching the image will also deteriorate the image quality and you don’t want your audience to associate second-rate quality with your business brand.
  • The Facebook frame cuts of the top pixel of your image, so in reality only the bottom 314 pixels will display. Niggly but important since you might want to check that you don’t lose the most important 1 pixel!

What to add and what to avoid

Facebook guidelines stipulate that the cover photo mustn’t be overly promotional in execution. In other words, it shouldn’t contain the following:

All covers are public. This means that anyone who visits your Page will be able to see your cover. Covers can’t be deceptive, misleading, or infringe on anyone else’s copyright. You may not encourage people to upload your cover to their personal timelines.
Covers may not include:
i.    images with more than 20% text;
ii.    price or purchase information, such as “40% off” or “Download it on socialmusic.com”;
iii.    contact information such as a website address, email, mailing address, or information that should go in your Page’s “About” section;
iv.    references to Facebook features or actions, such as “Like” or “Share” or an arrow pointing from the cover photo to any of these features; or
v.    calls to action, such as “Get it now” or “Tell your friends.”

So what can we do with our cover photo?

  • Use imagery or design work that is yours to begin with. Grab your camera or iPhone and take pictures or ask a professional photographer to help capture your people, your brand and your products. You can have lots of creative fun with this!
  • Remember to give credit if you use photos or visuals that aren’t yours!
  • Use your business tagline and add it as text to your cover photo.
  • Tag people who are in the photo. Be sure to ask their permission if they are associates or clients. If they are staff members, notify them! It is a frowned-upon tactic to tag random people in your cover to shamelessly promote your business.
  • Get your employs and clients to submit their pictures to use for the cover.

Make sure that you use high-quality photos and visuals that are in-focus.

Getting the photo onto Facebook

A couple of clicks an you’ll be done.

  1. Log into your Facebook Page admin account.
  2. To replace an existing cover photo, mouse over your cover photo so that the “Change Cover” button appears in the lower right corner; click it.
  3. Select “Upload Photo,” find the image file on your computer, then click the “Save Changes” button.
  4. Then click on the photo to add a caption, tags, and location information.

Next time we’ll look into how to create GREAT Facebook Cover images!

Diva, over-and-out.

If all the pixels got you warped and confused, perhaps it’s time to call in some help :)
junkies@adrinalinconcept.co.za
ADRINALIN CONCEPT | Comprehensive Creative Design, Marketing, Communication, Social Media, Copy Writing & Change Management

 

** Useful site: http://www.copyblogger.com/timeline-cover-photo/


Lekker local social-mix

So we have established that America has left me with an epiphany. We are not American! Great you say, she flies thousands of kilometers to figure out something we already knew. Well, I believe there is more to it.

Why the difference matters

Being different might be an established fact in your mind but wherever I look I see the same international laws and premises being applied to our local culture. There are a growing number of individuals who offer their services and expertise on the Social Media Communications front but they are all doing the same thing. Reading the same Mashable posts and tips, using Google and finding resources like Social Media Examiner and imposing their truths on the South African market. If we agree that the South African market is different then we need to accept the implications of that statement. We cannot impose their rules on our market. We simply aren’t ready for it yet. To refresh yourself on why I believe our market is so different, read this post.

So what do we do?

Take a deep breath. We will be fine. We will also probably catch up with the American (and other international) markets but until we do we need to make our rules stick.

The American market (and home to the famous reference sites like SME, Mashable and others) uses social media as an accepted communication platform, they use multiple platforms without going into shock and private users accept that businesses and brands will communicate with them socially.

The South African market is still debating whether or not to jump into the social pool. Individuals are still obsessed with the threat of identity theft. Once we decide to venture into the pool, we fret about which platform, how often, why, and what to say. We are still living in fear of the social media revolution. I do believe that this will change but it doesn’t change the fact that our approach should be different.

How to communicate with the SOUTH AFRICAN market SOCIALLY:

  1. Stop obsessing about frequency and timings of your posts / tweets or pins. Focus on being authentic. Don’t waste time with irrelevant updates that are both annoying and time-wasters. American trends have taught us that interaction is most effective when FB post happen at least daily and tweets are sent at least 8 times per day – true for a country that has enough happening to fill the space.
  2. Look at the game plan. Social media is here to stay. It will grow and evolve with time and so will you. Just because you communicate via Facebook today doesn’t mean you can’t change your mind in the future. It is a free world and we live in a country that encourages democratic opinions. Decide what will work for you now, use it, try it and adapt.
  3. Remember the local-is-lekker consumer. South African consumers are by nature more distrustful. We are hesitant to engage with internet sites, we doubt most of what we read (unless it is a SPAM-chain-mail that offers millions if you only send it on and CC IOL!) and we have only a small percentage of our market represented on the internet. In the bigger scheme of things, don’t drop all your communication efforts in favour of a social media strategy that will exhaust you. Perspective….

Was it all for nothing?

Of course not. Like I said. Social media is here to stay. Get used to it. Incorporate it into your marketing mix but remember that we are a proud country with a unique, diverse population. Don’t obsess about Facebook, Twitter & YouTube. Relax. Remember that social media, more than any other communication platform available to you, is about creating a conversation with your market. So start talking.

That isn’t so frightening, is it?

Diva, out.


Blogging Success

Blogging

The art of blogging – i.e. the ability to engage with your (often diverse) readers in such a way that you continue to add value to their business / personal growth / travel plans / upcoming marriage turmoil etc etc etc. **Please substitute to include your area of blogging-preference.

This task s quite arduous, especially if you consider that most bloggers qualify to this status / title by virtue of ‘simply diving in’.

Making your blog great

  1. Blog regularly. You wanted the attention, no knuckle down and type my friend. Daily if possible – remember we are dealing with the cyber-consumer who demands instant-gratification.
  2. Type and read. Type and read. You remember ‘wax on, wax off’? Same story. Write, read, edit. As cathartic as blogging is, make sure that you are ready to send your thoughts in to cyber space when you hit “publish.”
  3. Keep up to date with relevant news in your industry or interest area. Keep it new, fresh and exciting but don’t just share and reblog what others write. Make it your own. Add an opinion or ask a question.
  4. Answer comments and questions quickly. Be polite, I guess.
  5. Add pictures. Remember that pictures speak as well. Use them to visually enhance and emphasise what you are saying. Get creative. Have some fun if you dare.
  6. Links! Link to other relevant commentaries and blogs. Comment and leave your own blog address. As much as I love Dolly, this is not about being an ‘Island in the Stream’. Forget isolation, think of being ‘The cosmopolitan underground-and-inter-connected railway”.
  7. Guest bloggers. Colleagues and experts who can engage with your readers. Even in the narcissistic world of blogging, consider that YOURS is not the only voice that deserves to be heard.
  8. Categories. Figure out what you want to write about, categorise your blog and make sure your posts add value to those topical areas.

Even more tips

Get your blog out there.

  1. Share your blog via your website.
  2. Add your blog URL to your email signature
  3. Share your posts on your social media platforms.

And finally,

Write about things that matter to you. Something you can sink your newly manicured nails into. Give it some meat and seasoning and watch-out for the return!

Diva, over-and-out :)